All You Need To Know About Built-In Functions of Python

Built-in functions/Methods : The weapon in python which will improve your logic building and boost up problem solvings.

Built-in Functions are the pre-written code snippets in a langauge which can be called for a particular task. The reason why programming languages have built-in functions is pretty obvious that it helps you to make your code more easier and solution more approachable. The Built-in functions are the members of the different data types classes and are used with them, what it means is that string data type has its own built-in functions while list, tuple, set, dictionary, etc will have their own collection of built-in functions.

Note: Built-in Functions are also called the Methods of a class.

In this article, we will be seeing all the built-in functions of string, list, tuple, set and dictionary. So, this article is your one stop solution for built-in functions/methods.

Before starting that, let us see how to use these built-in functions:

 

The class can be data values like string, list, tuples, etc. Function are the inbuilt function which we will specify and the values differentiate from function to function and their uses.

Scroll Till End For Bonus.

 

Built-in Functions in Strings

Method
Description
capitalize()
Converts the first character to upper case
casefold()
Converts string into lower case
center()
Returns a centered string
count()
Returns the number of times a specified value occurs in a string
encode()
Returns an encoded version of the string
endswith()
Returns true if the string ends with the specified value
expandtabs()
Sets the tab size of the string
find()
Searches the string for a specified value and returns the position of where it was found
format()
Formats specified values in a string
format_map()
Formats specified values in a string
index()
Searches the string for a specified value and returns the position of where it was found
isalnum()
Returns True if all characters in the string are alphanumeric
isalpha()
Returns True if all characters in the string are in the alphabet
isdecimal()
Returns True if all characters in the string are decimals
isdigit()
Returns True if all characters in the string are digits
isidentifier()
Returns True if the string is an identifier
islower()
Returns True if all characters in the string are lower case
isnumeric()
Returns True if all characters in the string are numeric
isprintable()
Returns True if all characters in the string are printable
isspace()
Returns True if all characters in the string are whitespaces
istitle()
Returns True if the string follows the rules of a title
isupper()
Returns True if all characters in the string are upper case
join()
Joins the elements of an iterable to the end of the string
ljust()
Returns a left justified version of the string
lower()
Converts a string into lower case
lstrip()
Returns a left trim version of the string
maketrans()
Returns a translation table to be used in translations
partition()
Returns a tuple where the string is parted into three parts
replace()
Returns a string where a specified value is replaced with a specified value
rfind()
Searches the string for a specified value and returns the last position of where it was found
rindex()
Searches the string for a specified value and returns the last position of where it was found
rjust()
Returns a right justified version of the string
rpartition()
Returns a tuple where the string is parted into three parts
rsplit()
Splits the string at the specified separator, and returns a list
rstrip()
Returns a right trim version of the string
split()
Splits the string at the specified separator, and returns a list
splitlines()
Splits the string at line breaks and returns a list
startswith()
Returns true if the string starts with the specified value
strip()
Returns a trimmed version of the string
swapcase()
Swaps cases, lower case becomes upper case and vice versa
title()
Converts the first character of each word to upper case
translate()
Returns a translated string
upper()
Converts a string into upper case
zfill()
Fills the string with a specified number of 0 values at the beginning
 

Built-in Functions in List 

Method
Description
append()
Adds an element at the end of the list
clear()
Removes all the elements from the list
copy()
Returns a copy of the list
count()
Returns the number of elements with the specified value
extend()
Add the elements of a list (or any iterable), to the end of the current list
index()
Returns the index of the first element with the specified value
insert()
Adds an element at the specified position
pop()
Removes the element at the specified position
remove()
Removes the first item with the specified value
reverse()
Reverses the order of the list
sort()
Sorts the list
 

Built-in Functions in Tuple

Method
Description
count()
Returns the number of times a specified value occurs in a tuple
index()
Searches the tuple for a specified value and returns the position of where it was found
 

Built-in Functions in Set

MethodDescription
add()Adds an element to the set
clear()Removes all the elements from the set
copy()Returns a copy of the set
difference()Returns a set containing the difference between two or more sets
difference_update()Removes the items in this set that are also included in another, specified set
discard()Remove the specified item
intersection()Returns a set, that is the intersection of two or more sets
intersection_update()Removes the items in this set that are not present in other, specified set(s)
isdisjoint()Returns whether two sets have a intersection or not
issubset()Returns whether another set contains this set or not
issuperset()Returns whether this set contains another set or not
pop()Removes an element from the set

 

Built-in Functions in Dictionary

Method
Description
clear()
Removes all the elements from the dictionary
copy()
Returns a copy of the dictionary
fromkeys()
Returns a dictionary with the specified keys and value
get()
Returns the value of the specified key
items()
Returns a list containing a tuple for each key value pair
keys()
Returns a list containing the dictionary's keys
pop()
Removes the element with the specified key
popitem()
Removes the last inserted key-value pair
setdefault()
Returns the value of the specified key. If the key does not exist: insert the key, with the specified value
update()
Updates the dictionary with the specified key-value pairs
values()
Returns a list of all the values in the dictionary

 

BONUS: USING dir() and help()

 

If we run dir(class) we get list of all the functions of that class and help(class) gives the detailed explanation of each function.

 

End of the article, I hope that you all learned something new today. You can bookmark this blog for your future purposes and if you have any question related to python, you can even reach out to me through this platform eduyear.com.


Priyam Kapoor

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